Book Scavenger Hunt #3: Archipelago Books

I’ve recently fallen in love with the Brooklyn-based nonprofit indie press, Archipelago Books. I love their satisfyingly minimalist book designs. I especially love their mission to publish beautiful translations of classic and contemporary world literature. This includes literature written originally in Arabic, Spanish, Norwegian, Dutch, Tamil, Russian, Slovenian, Greek, and more. According to the press’s website, “less than three percent of new literature published in the United States originates outside the Anglosphere.” This is why Archipelago’s work is so important—to find illuminating international writers that American readers might not otherwise encounter.

So far, I’ve only read Love by Hanne Ørstavik (winner of the PEN Translation Prize and a finalist for the 2018 National Book Award for Translated Literature), which was hauntingly outstanding. Now, I can’t wait to go back and read the entire Archipelago catalogue.

Can you name all 14 Archipelago Books titles featured in these slivers?

Want more challenges? Check out my Book Scavenger Hunt #1 (Riverhead Books) and #2 (Graywolf Press)!

Book Scavenger Hunt #1: Riverhead Books

Last Friday, our publishing class had the great opportunity to Skype with Jynne Dilling Martin of Riverhead Books. We chatted all about the history of Riverhead, the changes that social media has made for the industry, and tips on how to break into the NYC publishing scene.

One thing that particularly stuck with me from Jynne’s talk was how the design team at Riverhead strives to craft a unique “visual identity” for each title. Essentially, this means that if you eliminated the text from each cover, you’d still be able to identify the books based on the graphics alone.(Remember this Buzzfeed quiz on classic book covers?)

So in order to test this, I created a fun collaged scavenger hunt, in which I have tucked 18 of Riverhead’s stunning book covers inside. Some are more subtle than others. Can you find them all? Leave your guesses in the comments below!

 

 

 

{What a time to be a Libra}

Need a boost? Let the Astro Poets take care of you:

Week of Feb. 10: 

A pile of pink glitter will appear. It may or may not be in the shape of your name. You’ve been telling yourself you’d better come to terms with it all. Don’t waste any more time standing still.

Week of Feb. 17: 

There will be health there will be flowers there will be money there will be strawberries. The only thing missing may be a song. Can you go into the past and find it. Probably you will have to go into the future.

(I have gone into the future and found my missing songs. Here they are below:)

Let me know in the comments: which missing songs are YOU bringing back from the future?

New Essay up at Entropy

I am excited and humbled and incredibly nervous to share my newest piece of nonfiction, “The Fly,” which was recently published online as part of Entropy‘s “Health and Wellness” series.

The fly has become a deep symbol in my life for a kind of never-ending state of recovery, and the insect’s incessant nature sparks the question: Is there such a thing as recovery? Can physical and mental recoveries align, and if so, how long does that alignment take?

Historically, this has been an extremely difficult topic for me to discuss, and I have only recently been able to put it into words. I don’t know if I will ever say all that I want to say on this particular topic, or if I will ever say it HOW I want to say it, but this is me now, attempting just that.

I hope that my piece allows someone to realize they’re not alone and gives them inspiration to tell their own stories.

And when it does and asks for shelter, I’ll surely offer up my body as host to that buzzing fly, because now that there’s enough of me to protect the two of us at once, the least I can do is be hospitable.

A huge thanks to Ian Riggins at Entropy for publishing it and being so wonderful to work with!

 

Sandbox Notes: Sipping Polaroid Coffee in a Sea of Ink

Want to dig deeper into the sandbox? Explore more at these links:

The origin of wearing surgical masks in Asia is a surprisingly long-standing tradition.

-The author and artist, Franky Frances Cannon, analyzes and reflects on her relationship with her mother and mental illness in her beautiful book, The Highs & Lows of Shapeshift Ma and Big-Little Frank.

-Edward Gorey’s Victorian drama of library paste and throbblefooted specters: (video)

-So you want to hear a mbira, caxixi, talking drum, surdo, dumbek, and tabla all at once? You’re in luck! Check out “Hall of Mirrors,” composed by Rick Baitz, and featuring percussionists Christian Lundqvist, Jeremy Smith, and Brian Shankar Adler.

-Every artist needs their own Ink House. (P.S. I love this Apartment Theory article about the poet Morgan Parker’s  unique ink house!)

 

About Sandbox Notes. Collections by Cameron Finch.